Tag Archives: You’ve Got Mail

“Something really depressing…like a Baby Gap”

24 Apr

Continuing through my stages of grief:

“People are always telling you that change is a good thing. But all they’re really saying is that something you didn’t want to happen at all has happened. My store is closing this week. I own a store…did I ever tell you that? It’s a lovely store. And in a week it will be something really depressing. Like a Baby Gap. Soon we’ll just be a memory. In fact, someone, some foolish person will probably think it’s a tribute to this city — the way it keeps changing on you, or the way you can never count on it, or something. I know because that’s the sort of thing I’m always saying, but the truth is —

“I’m heartbroken.

“I feel as if a part of me has died. And my mother has died all over again. And no one can ever make it right.”

 

Translation

20 Apr

Somebody grab a copy of You’ve Got Mail, put the box of Kleenex in the shopping bag and sit down to watch with me. The Ephron girls did a pretty good job getting the situational accuracy right, so now I’m going to offer a somewhat unfiltered translation of the subtext to give you a little slice of what my life at work is actually like right now.

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9 new, fresh approaches to the old, tired job search

11 Mar

#hireme

This time it’s going to be different.

Do you ever get tired of change? My life is on the verge of change…again. Occasionally there have been changes that were happily met, but I find the more fear I feel for what’s behind the mystery door, the more resistant I tend to be toward going through it. What could be behind that door could be SO AMAZING. Is it the pessimist in me — or the small fearful child — who believes it’s more practical to be ready for the worst to come through it at me instead? Continue reading

Christmas flick #9

16 Dec

You’ve Got Mail

I know a lot of guys don’t like this film, and I know there are folks who are not Ephron fans.  But I can’t help myself.  “Bouquets of sharpened pencils?”  Come on!  I watch this film whenever I’m feeling the seasons change…the fall, during Christmas, the dark of winter, when spring finally begins to appear.  Or just when I have a million flu-related kleenexes lying around everywhere.  I love that the story spans the seasons, and perhaps I could argue that the seasons themselves are characters in this film.  Whatever.  I just know that regardless of Kathleen’s weird relationship issues, this film helps me remember that the bad things in life only last for a season.  That after the old year comes the new one.  And it also taught me how to spell fox.  “F-O-X.”

These days the film is hitting a little closer to home in a different way. Continue reading